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Posted at November 7, 2020

Some of these findings will no doubt similarly fly in the face of the popular narrative for how the social world of markets and politics works, but they will similarly lead to useful applications. Here, for example, is Frederic Remington’s 1889 painting A Dash for the Timber, a work that was largely responsible for catapulting Remington to national prominence, replete with a whole posse of flying horses (h/t to John Batton in Ft. Worth, who knows his Amon Carter Museum collection!). It’s the ascendancy of non-human intelligences, which I’ve written about in lots of Epsilon Theory notes, from Rise of the Machines to First Known When Lost to Troy Will Burn – the Big Deal about Big Data to The Talented Mr. Ripley to One MILLION Dollars to Two Discoveries. Stillman, who gave ZERO credit to Muybridge for the work … after all, Muybridge was just Stanford’s work-for-hire employee, a member of the gig economy of the 1870s), artists continued to prefer the more narrative-pleasing view of flying horses. This question had bedeviled the Sport of Kings for ages, and while Stanford favored the “unsupported transit” theory of yes, all four hooves leaving the ground for a split-second in the outstretched position, allowing horses to briefly “fly”, he — as rich guys often do — really, really, really needed to know for sure. Or maybe the jurors were just bought off. It’s what most of the world calls Artificial Intelligence, which is a term I dislike for its pejorative anthropomorphism. In their published form they laid out the span of time captured by the cameras as sequences of stop-motion images unlike anything that had been seen before. After learning that wife Flora’s 7-month old son Florado was perhaps not biologically his, Muybridge tracked Larkyns down and shot him point-blank in the chest with the immortal words, “Good evening, Major, my name is Muybridge and here’s the answer to the letter you sent my wife.” In one of the more prominent early cases of jury nullification (Phillip Glass has an opera, The Photographer, with a libretto based on the court transcripts), Muybridge was found not guilty on the grounds of justifiable homicide despite the judge’s clear instructions to the contrary. Stopping Time: The Horse in Motion. Yes, all four hooves leave the ground at the same time. Powerful non-human intelligences are the modern day Oracle of Delphi. Elk Running, from Animal Locomotion, circa 1887. As a horse sped by, it tripped wires connected to the cameras, which took 12 photos in rapid succession. Eadweard MuybridgeThe Horse in Motion, illus. In fact, for decades after the 1882 publication of The Horse in Motion in book form (a book by Leland Stanford’s fellow rich guy friend, J.D.B. Given the limitations of photographic processes at this date, Muybridge’s first results were unpublishable. This is the goal of the Narrative Machine research project (read about it in The Narrative Machine and American Hustle). Pig Walking, from Animal Locomotion, circa 1887. by Muybridge. It is not investment research or a research recommendation, as it does not constitute substantive research or analysis. Camel Running, from Animal Locomotion, circa 1887. Horse With Rider, from Animal Locomotion, circa 1887. Muybridge’s experiments initially took place at the Sacramento racetrack, and were funded by the wealthy Leland Stanford. By 1878 he was photographing horses in motion using batteries of cameras, their shutters triggered by the horse’s movement over trip wires. This commentary is being provided to you as general information only and should not be taken as investment advice. But what does it have to do with modern markets and investing? The opinions expressed in these materials represent the personal views of the author(s). That’s the horse I’m betting on in Epsilon Theory. Epsilon Theory will not accept liability for any loss or damage, including without limitation to any loss of profit, which may arise directly or indirectly from use of or reliance on such information. Muybridge developed the images on site and, in the frames, revealed that a horse is completely aloft with its hooves tucked underneath it for a brief moment during a stride. 24 Frames Show Man in Loincloth Running, from Animal Locomotion, circa 1887. The revelation, imperceptible to the naked eye but apparent through photography, marked a new purpose for the medium. Consult your investment advisor before making any investment decisions. Some already suspected that this was so, but the key moment was too fleeting for the human eye to see. Visit the TIME Shop to purchase prints, posters and more. by Muybridge 1878© Prints & Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Eadweard MuybridgeThe Horse in Motion, illus. Stillman, who gave ZERO credit to Muybridge for the work … after all, Muybridge was just Stanford’s work-for-hire employee, a member of the gig economy of the 1870s), artists continued to prefer the more narrative-pleasing view of flying horses. As the owner of many thoroughbred racehorses, Stanford wanted to understand the physiology of a horse’s movement to inform his breeding and training programmes. Today we are at the dawning of a technology that similarly allows for a quantum leap forward in how humans perceive the world, but with a focus on the social world as opposed to the natural world. Leopard Leaping, from the Animal Locomotion series, circa 1887. They can “see” dimensions of the world that human intelligences cannot, and if we can ask the right questions we can share in their vision, as well. Pigeon in Flight, from Animal Locomotion, circa 1887. In 1872 Muybridge’s photographic skills were called on to prove whether a galloping horse lifts all four hooves off the ground at one point in its sequence of motion. This was the question photographer Eadweard Muybridge set out to answer in 1878. Muybridge’s stop-motion technique was an early form of animation that helped pave the way for the motion-picture industry, born a short decade later. In 1872, noted horseracing aficionado and San Francisco rich guy Leland Stanford (yes, of university fame) commissioned noted photographer and San Francisco smart guy Eadweard Muybridge to apply his path breaking technology of stop-action photography to settle a long-running debate — do all four hooves leave the ground at the same time when horses run? Leland Stanford spared no expense in paying for Muybridge’s defense. Ostrich Running, from Animal Locomotion, circa 1887. It must be noted, that no one can accurately predict the future of the market with certainty or guarantee future investment performance. Railroad tycoon and former California governor Leland Stanford was convinced the answer was yes and commissioned Muybridge to provide proof. Instead, it’s in the tucked position, which — because it’s not as romantic a narrative as flying — had never been widely considered as an answer. PDF Download (Paid Subscription Required): http://www.epsilontheory.com/download/16106/. And eventually he did. Muybridge’s work, The Horse in Motion, settled the question of unsupported transit once and for all. The unseen dimensions of the social world that I’m interested in tapping with the help of non-human intelligences are the dimensions of unstructured data, the words and images and communications that comprise the ocean in which the human social animal swims. It’s what Neville Crawley calls Big Compute, which is a great phrase, not least for its progression and distinction from the old hat notion of Big Data (h/t to Neville for turning me on to the Muybridge story, too). The results were a technical and conceptual breakthrough. Muybridge developed the images on site and, in the frames, revealed that a horse is completely aloft with its hooves tucked underneath it for a brief moment during a stride. This: Muybridge developed a technology that allowed for a quantum leap forward in how humans perceived the natural world. The technology I’m talking about is the biggest revolution in the world today. That just as Eadweard Muybridge took snapshots of the natural world using his new technology, so do I think it possible to take snapshots of the social world using our new technology. They already are. Scared money can’t win and a worried man can’t love. Muybridge shot the photographs in June 1878. It could capture truth through technology. We think the representation to be unimpeachable, until we throw all our preconceived impressions on one side, and seek the truth by independent observations from Nature herself. ―  Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses (1992). It took Muybridge about 12 years to complete the work, interrupted in part by his murder trial. Explore more iconic images that changed the world. In 1872 Muybridge’s photographic skills were called on to prove whether a galloping horse lifts all four hooves off the ground at one point in its sequence of motion.

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